«

»

Nov 26

More Doctors Recommend ECigarettes to Their Patients

Last updated on May 20th, 2017 at 01:47 pm

Share Button

doctors looking at test results on a pc

Recent Studies Show A Majority Of Doctors Support E-Cigarettes

This article was updated June 23rd, 2016

Now that the FDA has set regulations on vaporized nicotine products (ecigs) one might think that the heated controversy over e-cigarettes would subside; at least within the medical community. Not so.

New research which favors ecigs as a viable smoking cession product is prompting medical professionals to lean on the FDA to take a more “open-minded” perspective when it comes to regulating vapor products. 

In 2016 seven leading international medical professionals who specialize in tobacco control believe that electronic cigarettes can lead to reduced cigarette smoking overall with a potential reduction in smoking related deaths. The investigators are now encouraging the FDA to strongly consider the importance of ecigs and to move in a positive direction ensuring fair regulations for these potentially life-saving products. 

Past Evidence Still Supports Tobacco Harm Reduction 

Back in 2014 two large surveys were presented by health professionals at the Society for Research on Nicotine & Tobacco (SRNT) conference. It was reported that 15 to 21 million US adults regularly used e-cigarettes and of those users, 3.2 – 4.3 million no longer regularly smoke cigarettes. 

In the same year WebMD endorsed the use of electronic cigarettes.  This was a major milestone for tobacco harm reduction. 

The American Association of Public Health Physicians now believes electronic cigarettes offer a “strongly positive alternative to traditional cigarettes”. They also believe that the Food and Drug Administration's stand on ecigs should reflect that premise. Although the FDA has not conducted their own series of testing, Mitch Zeller, director of the FDA's Center for Tobacco Products has been quoted as saying,

“We’ve been given an opportunity to make a serious dent in the death and disease toll, now that we can regulate these….Let’s not lose our focus on what the primary cause is for those 480,000 avoidable deaths each year—it’s primarily burning, combusting cigarettes.”

Tobacco cigarettes contain thousands of toxic chemicals while e-cigarettes contain only FDA approved ingredients. 

Today the FDA and the vaping industry wrestle with deeming ecig regulations and their detrimental affects on the future of vaping. Perhaps this is why we are seeing more doctors and health care professionals publicly recognizing the benefits of vaping over smoking tobacco cigarettes. 

The Fight For Effective Tobacco Harm Reduction

Also in 2016, a landmark review by Public Health England concluded that electronic cigarettes were at least 95% and no less than 98% safer than tobacco cigarettes.

The World Health Organization (WHO), on the other hand, still insists that people stick with approved smoking cessation methods such as nicotine patches, gums and pharmaceuticals, but many doctors now realize that these methods can be ineffective. The smoking cessation drug, Chantix has even been known to have life threatening side effects.

Unfortunately the powerful WHO fears that vaping will “normalize” smoking for a new generation simply because e-cigarettes look like tobacco cigarettes and a smoker enjoys the same “hand to mouth” movements as smoking. Scientific evidence now shows that electronic cigarettes may actually reduce teen smoking rates. 

While there is still much confusion and misinformation regarding electronic cigarettes, support is growing, particularly among practicing medical professionals as new scientific studies emerge regarding ecig safety.

If You Smoke, You Still Have a Choice

The number of tobacco smokers is diminishing worldwide while e-cigarette sales continue to grow. Additional evidence from the CDC indicates that from 2015-2016 the smoking rate dropped faster than it has in more than two decades. Vaping reached record highs during that same period.

FDA regulations are currently under scrutiny; some say “under attack”, but the agency admits regulations will not affect the vapor industry for many years.

Making the transition from tobacco to vapor can seem daunting with so many brands and vapor products on the market. CloudNine offers many e-cigarette reviews and several comparison charts if you need help in choosing an electronic cigarette kit from a quality manufacturer that already has millions of satisfied customers.

If you smoke, you owe it to yourself to try a better alternative. One that is gaining in popularity worldwide not only among the millions of new vapers, but among respected scientists and practicing physicians as well.

Ready to make the switch? Check out this easy to use Best Electronic Cigarette Comparison Chart or our Best Selling eGo Tank Systems Comparison Chart 

UPDATE – OCTOBER 2016:

The scientific consensus behind e-cigarettes continues to strengthen this week, with two separate studies – one in England and one in India – confirming that the devices are an effective tool for smokers who want to quit. Meanwhile other researchers found that despite previous alarmist claims, e-cig vapour causes no detectable damage to lung cells.

 

V2 Cigs electronic cigarettes - best ecigs worldwide

Share Button

2 pings

  1. Why Is it So Difficult to Quit Smoking?

    […] we do know is that they are less toxic than tobacco cigarettes and that more doctors are recommending e-cigarettes to their patients who smoke. […]

  2. Why the Tobacco Industry Sells E-Cigarettes | E-Cigarette News

    […] replacement products and failed, continue to be attracted to e-cigarettes; the smoking alternative more doctors are recommending; one that offers the physical sensation of smoking without the tobacco combustion, tobacco smoke, […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>